Rollover Kills Man from Remote, Oregon

Date: December 24, 2009
Location: Highway 42, near Remote, Oregon
Names: Kenneth Michael Rasmussen

Kenneth Michael Rasmussen, 48, of Bakersfield, California, died December 24, 2009, in a single-vehicle truck crash on an icy bridge near the small town of Remote, Oregon, east of Myrtle Point in Coos County.

KPIC-TV reports that the crash occurred on Highway 42, about five miles east of Remote, as Rasmussen was driving west. Around 9:45 AM, Rasmussen lost control of his truck on an icy bridge. It started to fishtail, hit an embankment on the shoulder, and rolled twice before coming to rest on its top.

Despite using safety restraints, Rasmussen was pronounced dead at the scene. There were no passengers in the truck.

Oregon State Police
troopers from the Coos Bay Area Command office are continuing to investigate.

We are so sorry to hear about this accident, and we send our thoughts and wishes to Rasmussen’s family.

An accident like this shows one of the big dangers of winter driving: running into a patch of ice.

It is extremely important to be aware of the risks of ice on the road as you drive this winter. The Oregon Department of Transportation, in “Winter Driving Can Be Tricky,” warns that better cars, better roads, and better tires don’t take the place of careful driving.

Tips for Winter Driving:

•    Keep a good grip on the steering wheel. Do not make sudden turns; if you skid, correct your car using a light touch.
•    If you find yourself skidding, ease your foot off the accelerator. If you have a manual transmission, push in the clutch. While keeping your foot off the brake, steer the same direction your car’s rear end is skidding.
•    If you hit a patch of ice, ease up on the accelerator and let your car “roll” through.
•    Remember that posted speed limits are meant for dry conditions, not rain, snow, sleet, or ice. Slow down during winter weather.

What to do now:

•    Be prepared. Take a moment today to double-check your owner’s manual for the best braking technique for your car. Also, stash an emergency kit in the trunk.
•    Read our tips on driving in the rain.
•    Always make sure you and your passengers are wearing safety restraints.

Did you know that single-car accidents are not always the driver’s fault? It can be caused by anything from weather, a wild animal crossing the road, to a city, county, or state agency not maintaining roads. If you or a family member has questions after a single-car crash, let us know, we’ll help you through the process.